CBD & THC

THC CBD

Okay, let's clear up the topic that perceives CBD in a negative light. CBD is closely associated with the compound THC; an illegal compound that makes users high! CBD does not make users high. Read on to understand some of the differences between CBD and THC...

>THC has a high affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors

>CBD has a low affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors.

Affinity refers to the strength of a molecule to bind to a receptor site. Therefore, THC directly binds to the receptor sites on CB1 and CB2 receptors and activates them, leading to a cascade of reactions resulting in changes in signalling. CBD does not directly bind to CB1 and CB2 receptors.

THC and marijuana are classified as class-B illegal drugs. CBD is not a drug.

CB1 receptors are responsible for most signalling in the Endocannabinoid system in the brain. When THC enters to the body, it binds with CB1 receptors in the brain due to it’s high affinity for CB1 receptors. The binding of THC with CB1 receptors causes activation of the CB1 receptors in the brain, decreasing the release of neurotransmitters in the brain and causing a psychoactive effect (a ‘high’).

Most importantly, CBD does not create a psychoactive effect (a ‘high’) as has a low affinity for CB1 receptors and therefore does not bind with CB1 receptors to activate them. Our CBD products contain less than 0.2% THC (we have certification to support this) and are classed as food supplements.

CBS vs THC

Most importantly, CBD does not create a psychoactive effect (a ‘high’) as has a low affinity for CB1 receptors and therefore does not bind with CB1 receptors to activate them. Our CBD products contain less than 0.2% THC (we have certification to support this) and are classed as food supplements.

CBD and THC infographic

It is easy to mix up CBD and THC. We try and break it down for you

Research has shown that the mechanism by which a ‘high’ is created occurs when THC is absorbed in the body and completes a complementary bind with CB1 receptors in the brain. This binding causes a cascade of biochemical reactions which decrease neurotransmitter release in the brain and leads to a ‘high’ effect. As discussed above, CBD is unable to bind to CB1 receptors, so it does not create a ‘high’.

Marijuana plants are usually cultivated to create buds with a rich THC content. Whereas Hemp plants are cultivated with a low THC content in mind. Additionally, CBD products are produced with a low THC content (broad-spectrum CBD should contain less than 0.2% THC). The CBD in our CBD products come from the Cannabis sativa L. plant, generally known as industrial Hemp. Industrial Hemp is cultivated to produce CBD-rich buds with a low THC content.

Furthermore, CBD has shown to neutralise the psychoactive effects of THC. When CBD is absorbed in the body, it interacts with the Endocannabinoid system, reducing the binding of THC to CB1 and CB2 receptors, disrupting the biochemical reaction that lead to a high. It is this interaction of CBD in the body which is why CBD is believed to be useful for individuals fighting substance abuse.

The similarities and differences between CBD and THC on a structural level can be seen below:

THC & CBD Chemical Compound

With the exact same number of Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen atoms, you would think CBD and THC would behave similarly in the body. However, it is the difference in structure (shown above) that differentiates their use in the body. Just the differences in the Cyclic ring in THC and the Hydroxyl group in CBD leads to a difference in structure and thus shape. With a difference in shape comes altering interactions with receptors sites, such as receptor site on CB1 and CB2 receptors. Image taken from: https://www.analyticalcannabis.com/articles/cbd-vs-thc-what-are-the-main-differences-297486

Products sold on this website are food supplements only. They are not intended to diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease. We recommend that you seek the advice of your doctor or medical professional before using any of the products advertised here.

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